Saturday, July 18, 2009

Fauvism at its Bestism

To your left you are going to see one of the more famous painting in the movement commonly known as "Fauvism". This painting (Portrait of Madame Matisse) is by Henri Matisse, who was a leader of the movement along with André Derain. Ok, let me quote Wikipedia just one more time. Fauvism can be seen as an approach to Expressionism (seeing as Matisse was inspired by Van Gogh). It encorporate "wild brush work and strident colors". The paintings are normally very simple in nature and composition (and I've noticed a lot of portraits).




I figure the best way for us to get a good idea of what Fauvism really is, we just need to see and observe a couple works under this particular "ism". Here goes:

André Derain by Henri Matisse
-I would say the identifying factor of this portrait is that of the author's name. Anything Matisse is all Fauvist.
 

Fauvism Flowers by Karen Fields
-If the title wasn't clue enough, the exquisite color and power of this piece would give you clues as to its Fauvist nature. The aim of all Fauvists was to employ the use of light and power.

Light and power?

Another highly expressionistic Fauvist painting. You would never see such color display in a harbor in reality. It challenges our already acquired knowledge of color and intensity.


Fauvism celebrates pure colors. As I read it from the internet: "Simplified designs combined in an orgy of pure colours dominate Fauvism." There you have it.


Woman With a Hat, 1905 by Henri Matisse

It is interesting how her face is a mixture of reds, and yellows, purples, blues, and I think I even saw a green in there. Matisse is not interested in mixing a perfect pallet to disguise the colors he's used. 

What is the advantage in such a technique? I mean, there must be something behind the phrase, "show them your true colors". If a color can represent a virtue, a vice, an attitude, a feeling or emotion, then why not paint the colors right on their faces? 

21 comments:

  1. I really like Matisse's paintings. I love the bold colors.

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  2. I think fauvism is cool. It seems like a little kid is choosing the colors for the artist, but that is what makes it beautiful. Its just another way to look at things.

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  3. I really like how you include the paintings in your blogs. it is much easier than trying to picture them.

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  4. This is so neat! I feel like I went to a mini exhibit with the descriptions of all! You must have spent a lot of time on this, thank you!

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  5. I am studing fauvism at home school and I am honored that u like it as much as i like it. Some people treat this like trash

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  6. i like it. it's cool

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  7. I don't like them so much. I mean I find it interesting how the artists portray the light and shadows through the intensity of their colour, but I much prefer the movement of realism.
    I really love this blog :-)

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  8. I'm doing it at school...i had to print off 2 pictures for a reference page...i chose the flowers and madame matisse...r these good examples

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  9. I'm also doing it at school...i had to print off 4 pictures and talk about them...i chose the flowers the woman with a hat and the old guy...r these good examples

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  10. i am working on a project in art and its about fauvism, i a really enjoying this subjest and love the vivid colours and imaginative pices of work.

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  11. Fauvism is a beautiful kind of art, and i can tell that you appreciate it. thanks for a great article.

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  12. fauvism is cool i like neon colors

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  13. your review on "fauvism"really helped me with my assighnment (as i needed to print a few pics of it) :)

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  14. history of the arts is great.. fauvism is one of the many best styles of arts.. i too study fauvism, impressionism, romantism n post impressionism.. it is great.. im luvin it

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  15. i love this site! it's really intersting, i love fauvism :)

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  16. Lovely post... and it was great to chance upon this page. I paint too and had tried my hand at fauvism and loved every bit of it. It is indeed a bit of gay abandon that actually tells you a lot more than what your eye can see.
    So, see!

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  17. suzan amato mef internationalNovember 5, 2012 at 6:43 AM

    youre cool dude

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  18. i am doing a project on this art and at first i hated it now i like love soo much well gtg :)

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  19. Thank you for including one of my pieces in your blog! My piece "Fauvism" is directly under "Fauvism Flowers" by Karen Fields. The inspiration for this work came from a pic of a flower sent to me by a special, vibrant friend.

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